Academic Employment

2012 - Present Associate Professor, History, University of Tennessee.

2006 - 2012 Assistant Professor, History, University of Tennessee.

2005 Adjunct Instructor, History, University of New Mexico.

2002 Adjunct Instructor, History, University of New Mexico.

Education

2006 Ph.D., History, University of New Mexico
Dissertation: “Between Prescription and Practice: Governance, Legal Culture, And Gender in Late-Colonial Quito, 1765-1830.”

1999 M.A., History, University of New Mexico
Thesis Title: “The Making of an Indigenous Movement: Meaning and Materiality in Ecuador.”

1994 B.S., History and Secondary Education, Appalachian State University

Publications

Limits of Gender Domination: Women, Law, and Political Crisis in Quito, 1765-1830. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2010.

Through analysis of extensive civil and criminal litigation, this book documents impressive economic, legal, and social rights customarily exercised by women of the corregimiento of Quito during the closing decades of Bourbon rule. Following the cultural logic of decentralism and negotiated consent, women were able to mitigate attempts by the centralizing Bourbon state to control their bodies and discourage access to legal resources. The narrative then analyzes the subsequent dismantling of customary legal rights with the emergence of a stricter, more hierarchical gender regime with the shift to a contract society through Ecuador’s experience of the Atlantic liberal revolution. On a scholarly level, the book represents a significant revision of late-colonial and early republican gender history. It is also filled with compelling human stories drawn from the litigation pursued in the barrios of Quito.

Chad Thomas Black, “Prosecuting Female-Female Sex in Bourbon Quito,” chapter in, Zeb Tortorici, editor, Sexuality and the Unnatural in Colonial Latin America, Berkley: University of California Press, 2016.

“Clustering with Compression for the Historian,” Journal of Digital Humanities 1.1 (Winter 2011), pp. 34-44. Also at: http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-1/clustering-with-compression-for-the-historian-by-chad-black/

“Voices: Sharing One’s Research,” with Mark Sample. In, Daniel Cohen and Tom Scheinfeldt, editors, Hacking the Academy: The Edited Volume (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press/digitalculturebooks, 2011).
http://www.digitalculture.org/hacking-the-academy/ The full, unedited version of my contribution is available at http://parezcoydigo.wordpress.com/2010/05/28/the-individual-research-archive-hacking-the-papers-of-you/.

“Between Prescription and Practice: Licensure and Women’s Legal Identity in Bourbon Quito, 1765-1810,” Colonial Latin American Review, 16.2 (2007): 273-298.

“The Making of and Indigenous Movement: Culture, Ethnicity, and Post-Marxist Social Praxis in Ecuador,” Research Paper Series No. 323 (May 1999), Albuquerque, NM: Latin American and Iberian Institute.

Awards, Fellowships, Grants

Fall 2011 Chancellor’s Grant for Faculty Research, University of Tennessee.

2009 Professional Development Award (PDA), University of Tennessee, Knoxville for summer research in Quito, Ecuador.

2002-2003 Fulbright-Hays International Dissertation Research Fellowship, Quito, Ecuador.

2000-2003 Ph.D. Fellowship, Latin American and Iberian Institute (LAII), UNM.

1999-2001 NDEA Title VI Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship (FLAS).

2000 Field Research Grant (FRG) for Pre-Dissertation Research, LAII, UNM.

Howard Rabinowitz Memorial Research Grant, Department of History, UNM.

Book Reviews

“A Review of Into the Archive: Writing and Power in Colonial Peru”, History: Review of New Books 39 (Oct. 2011): 117-118.

“Review: Raising an Empire: Children in Early Modern Iberia and Colonial Latin America, edited, Ondina E. González and Bianca Premo,” The Americas, 65.3 (January 2009): 429-431.

“Review: Blacks, Indians, and Spaniards in the Eastern Andes: Reclaiming the Forgotten in Colonial Mizque, 1550-1782, by Lolita Gutiérrez Brockington” Colonial Latin American Review, 17.1 (2008).

Works in Progress and Other Research Activities

Quito encarcelado/Quito jailed. A web-based database of 18th century detainees in the jails of the Audiencia of Quito, together with analytical essays and visualizations.

The Politics of Intimacy in the Spanish Empire. Active book and research project on the relationship between sexuality, punishment, and economic rationality in the age of Charles III (1759-1788). This project changes the way we analyze sexuality in the Spanish empire and understand its relationship to imperial rule under Spain’s eighteenth-century Bourbon dynasty. How do we theorize and substantiate popular sexual desire in the early-modern period? What role did controlling sexual activity play in the statecraft of early-modern Empire? In the period between 1760 and 1790, the Spanish imperial state in the Audiencia of Quito made dramatic new claims to control the sexual behaviors of its subjects. Royal authorities increasingly encroached on the traditional ecclesiastical territory of pastoral surveillance and moral correction. In the process, the state worked to conform sexual activities to the Bourbon Monarchy’s dream of a centralized, patriarchal, economically rational absolutism. Criminal prosecutions of illicit sexual behavior revealed the extent to which the sexual expectations of royal authorities diverged from popular practices. As such, the case files that preserve those prosecutions provide access to popular cultural values that diverged from church and state dictates, but were very rarely explicitly articulated. This project demonstrates that the effective criminalization of extramarital sex during the imperial reign of Charles III (1759-1788) turned non-marital sexual relationships into contested territory, upon which the empire sought to project its expansive claims to political and moral authority. Thus, my research works along parallel tracks to document the ways that the imperial state sought to buttress its authority through the control of sexual practices, while using the paper trail produced by this endeavor to analyze eighteenth-century sexualities. By situating popular sexual practices as normative, instead of reactive to elite notions of honor, this study offers a new kind of history of intimacy in the Spanish empire. Likewise, by focusing on the control extramarital sex, it offers a new history kind of Bourbon colonialism.

Prescott’s Atlantic. Active research project on the life and writings of William Hickling Prescott, the United States’ first internationally famous historian. Prescott created the discipline of imperial history in the United States with his wildly popular books The Conquest of Mexico (1843) and The Conquest of Peru (1847), works that are still in print and read today. This project uses his life, letters, and historical writings to provide a new narrative of the rise of historiography in the United States, the importance of the history of Spanish American empire to that literature, and the centrality of a transatlantic network of consular service to its emergence. The project uses group biography and thick descriptions of the locations of this transatlantic network of Prescott’s interlocutors to argue that his historical methods and his dealings with publishers place him, and the history of Spanish American imperialism, at the inception of a new historical consciousness in the United States. Prescott’s work established many of the defining assumptions of Latin American historiography and the region’s place in the American hemisphere that still hang low as a shadow over the discipline. His appeal in the 1840s signified that the establishment of modern historical practice in the United States was tied not only to the ideological needs of nationalist self-definition, but also to an expansionist colonialism aimed at Latin America, on the eve of the Mexican-American War.

University Service

2015-2017 Humanities Representative, College of Arts and Sciences Budget and Finance Committee.

2014-2015 Member, Life of the Mind Book Selection Committee, University of Tennessee

2014-2015 Member, Humanities Curriculum Committee, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Tennessee

2014-2015 Member, Social Sciences Curriculum Committee, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Tennessee

Fall 2013 Member, Search Committee for College of Arts and Sciences Web Development position.

2009-2010 Member, University of Tennessee Commission on LGBT People

Departmental Service

2014-2015 Associate Head of Department, Department of History, University of Tennessee.

2015 Member, Ad-hoc committee on Undergraduate Curricular Reforms, Department of History, University of Tennessee.

2014-Present Member, ex-officio, Undergraduate Committee, Department of History, University of Tennessee.

2014-Present Member, ex-officio, Head’s Advisory Committee, Department of History, University of Tennessee.

2013-2014 Member, Job Search Committee for position on the History of Slavery.

2012-2014 Director of Graduate Studies, Department of History, University of Tennessee.

2012-2013 Member and Diversity Advocate, Job Search Committee for a position in Early Islamic History.

2007 – 2013 Director Department of History Dissertation Writing Group. (With this group I have currently assisted sixteen students in the successful completion of either their Dissertation or Dissertation Prospectus.)

2011-2012 Member, Department of History Graduate Education Committee, University of Tennessee.

2009-2012 Chair of the Publicity Committee, Department of History, University of Tennessee.

2010-2011 Member, Department of History Undergraduate Education Committee, University of Tennessee.

Spring 2010 Member, Departmental Advisory Committee for a special College-run search for African and African-American Studies.

2009-2010 Member, Ad-Hoc Committee on History 510, Foundations of Graduate Study in History.

2009-2010 Member, Ad-Hoc Committee on designing the Department’s introductory graduate seminar, “Foundations of the Graduate Study of History.”

2008-2010 Member, Head’s Advisory Committee, Department of History, University of Tennessee.

2007-2009 Member, Undergraduate Education Committee, Department of History, University of Tennessee.

2008-2009 Member, Job Search Committee for position on Britain and its Empire/France and its Empire.

2007-2010 Founder and Coordinator, Dissertation Writing Seminar, Department of History, University of Tennessee.

2006-2008 Co-Founder and Coordinator, Theory Reading Group, Department of History, University of Tennessee.

Spring 2008 Member, Ad-Hoc Committee on Mentoring and Annual Review, History Department, University of Tennessee.

Service to the Discipline

2014 Member, McLeod Book Prize Committee, Latin American and Caribbean Section of the Southern Historical Association.

December 2012 Panelist/Reviewer, Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants, National Endowment for the Humanities.

Jan. 2012-Sept. 2014 Book Review Editor, The Latin Americanist

2012 Chair, Teaching and Teaching Materials Committee, Conference on Latin American History.

2011 Secretary, Teaching and Teaching Materials Committee, Conference on Latin American History.

January 2011 Peer referee for the Colonial Latin American Historical Review.

2010-2011 Program Chair for History and Social Science tracks for the 2011 Annual meeting of SECOLAS, Wilmington, NC, 16-19 March 2011.

2008-2009 Web Editor h-net Latin America website, maintaining links to blogs on Latin America. (http://www.h-net.org/~latam/blog/)

Invited Talks

Sypke call-in to discuss Limits of Gender Domination with “History of Gender in Latin America” seminar, Department of History, University of New Mexico, 22 September 2015.

“Quito Jailed: Institutional Profiling in the 18th Century,” Rice, University, 1 November 2012.

“Programming Methods for Preliminary Research,” Digital History Seminar, Rice University, 2 November 2012.

“From There to Here: A Path to Humanities Computing,” Faculty Research Seminar in Digital Humanities, University of Tennessee, 9 April 2012.

“We’re All Digital Historians.” Graduate Seminar in Advanced Historical Research Methods University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM. 4 April 2011.

“Digital Humanities in Research and Teaching.” German/French Seminar Bibliography and Methods of Research, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN. 16 November 2010.

“Archival Research in the Digital Age.” Seminar on Advanced Historical Research Methods, Department of History, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM. 1 October 2009.

“As One Would Treat a Woman: Gender and Same-Sex Sex in Bourbon Quito.” Invited talk, Department of History, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM. 15 April 2009.

“As One Would Treat a Woman: Gender, Sodomy, and Love in Late Colonial Quito.” Tuesday Lunch Series. Humanities Initiative, University of Tennessee, Knoxville. 7 April 2009.

“Edupunk: tech > ppt.” Invited talk on using Web 2.0 and social media technologies in the classroom. Dissertation and Professionalization Workshop. Department of History, Univ. of New Mexico. Albuquerque, NM, 30 March 2009.

Conference Papers

“Las mujeres de la cárcel: cumplimiento de la moral civil en Quito, Siglo XVIII.” Paper presented on panel, “Género y historia.” III Congreso Latinoamericano y Caribeño de Ciencias Sociales, Quito, Ecuador. 26 August 2015.

Chair, Phi Alpha Theta – Transnational Panel. The Southern Historical Association Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA. 14 November 2014.

“Challenges in Teaching the History of Gender in Colonial Latin America.” Paper presented on panel, “Women and Gender in the Latin American History Classroom: Diverse Approaches and Experiences.” The Southern Historical Association Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA. 15 November 2014.

Chair, “(Re) Shaping Cities and Nations during and after Colonialism.” Panel at the Southeastern Conference on Latin American Studies Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA. 28 March 2014.

Chair and Organizer, “Teaching and Teaching Materials Committee: 1973/2013: Chileanists Teach September 11^th^ at 40.” Roundtable for the Conference on Latin American History. American Historical Association Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA. 4 January 2013.

“Prosecuting Same-Sex Acts in Bourbon Quito.” Paper presented. to present for the panel, “Sexuality and the Unnatural in Colonial Latin America,” American Historical Association Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA. January 2013.

Selected Participant, NEH Workshop on “Topic Modeling for Humanities Research,” University of Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, 3 November 2012.

Participant, The Humanities and Technology Camp (THATCamp), Center for History and the New Media, George Mason University, 15-17 June 2012.

Panel Chair, “Legislating the Subaltern in the Andes and Beyond,” Conference on Latin American History (CLAH), Chicago, IL. 6 January 2012.

“Racial Silences in the Criminal Archive: Jail Censuses in Quito, 1750-1850.” Paper presented for the panel, “Racial Silences in the Archive and the Historiography of Race in Postcolonial Latin America.” American Historical Association Annual Conference, Chicago, IL. 7 January 2012.

Participant, The Humanities and Technology Camp (THATCamp) Un-Conference, Center for History and the New Media, George Mason University, 4-5 June 2011.

“Google Books and the N-Gram Viewer.” Paper presented at the Rocky Mountain Conference on Latin America Studies, Santa Fe, NM, 7 April 2011.

Program Chair, History and Social Sciences, SECOLAS 2011 Annual Meeting, Wilmington, NC, 16-19 March 2011.

Panel Moderator, “Indigenous Language and Practice: Cultural Meanings and Identity in Early Mexico.” SECOLAS 2011, 18 March 2011.

Panel Moderator, “Social Movements in Latin America at the Turn of the 21^st^ Century.” SECOLAS 2011, 17 March 2011.

Panel Moderator, “Popular Economies in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Mexico.” SECOLAS 2011, 17 March 2011.

Panel Organizer, “Negotiating Authority: Bureaucratic and Cultural Logics in the Early Modern Spanish Empire.” Conference on Latin American History (CLAH), Boston, Mass. 9 January 2011. (http://chadblack.net/clah2011)

“Negotiating Adultery in Bourbon Quito,” Paper presented at the Conference on Latin American History (CLAH), Boston, Mass. 9 January

  1. (http://chadblack.net/clah2011/)

Participant, The Humanities and Technology Camp – New Mexico (THATCampNM), National Hispanic Cultural Center, Albuquerque, NM. 2-3 October 2010. Led session on using Wordpress as a learning management system.

Participant, The Humanities and Technology Camp (THATCamp) Un-Conference, Center for History and the New Media, George Mason University, 22-23 May 2010.

“In the Name of the Republic, by Authority of the Law: Gender and Legal Culture in Revolutionary Quito, 1809-1830.” Paper presented at the South Eastern Conference on Latin American Studies, Mexico City, Mexico. 9 April 2010.

Participant and blog coordinator for “The Future of the Andean Past,” CLAH Andean Studies Roundtable. AHA/CLAH Annual Conference, San Diego, CA January 2010. Blog address: http://andeanstudies.wordpress.com.

“Content and Form: Reading Sexual Prosecutions in Late Colonial Quito,” paper presented at Rocky Mountain Conference on Latin American Studies, 56^th^ Annual Conference. Santa Fe, NM, 4-7 March 2009.

“By Authority of the Law: The Atlantic Liberal Revolution and Legal Culture in Early Republican Quito.” CLAH Andean Studies Roundtable. “The Andes Across Oceans: The Impact of Transatlantic and Transnational Currents on Andean History.” AHA/CLAH Annual Conference, New York City, January 2009.

“Public, Notorious, and Scandalous: Adultery and Normative Sexuality in Bourbon Quito,” paper to be presented at the 69^th^ Annual Meeting of the American Society for Ethnohistory, Eugene, OR, November 2008.

Co-organizer. “Unnatural Acts: Normative Gender and Aberrant Sex in Colonial Latin America,” session for LASA2007, Montreal, CA, September 2007.

“As (S)he Would Treat A Woman: Gender and Same-Sex Love in Bourbon Quito,” paper presented at LASA2007, Montreal CA, September 2007.

“‘I Appear and Say’: Post-coloniality and the Challenge of Women’s Legal Identity in Quito, 1765-1835,” presented at the 2007 Rocky Mountain Conference on Latin American Studies, Santa Fe, NM, 2007.

Como mas aya lugar en derecho, parezco y digo: Governance, Legal Culture, and Gender in Late-Colonial Quito,” presented at the 2006 Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association, Conference on Latin American History, Philadelphia, PA, 2006.

“Between Prescription and Practice: Women, Legality, and Identity in Quito’s Courts, 1765-1774,” presented at the Latin American Studies Association XXV International Congress, Las Vegas, NV, 2004.

“Gender and the Judiciary: A Case of Bad Shrimp in Late Colonial Quito,” presented at the 2004 Rocky Mountain Conference on Latin American Studies, Santa Fe, NM, 2004.

“Maritátegui Redux: Materialist Ubiquities in the Indigenous Movement of Ecuador,” presented at MARXISM2000, conference of Rethinking Marxism, Amherst, MA, 2000.

“The Making of an Indigenous Movement: Culture, Ethnicity, and Post-Marxist Social Praxis in Ecuador,” presented at the 1999 Rocky Mountain Conference on Latin American Studies, Colorado Springs, CO, 1999.

“The 1990 Indian Uprising in Ecuador: Culture, Ethnicity, and Post-Marxist Social Praxis in Ecuador,” presented at the Latin American Studies Association XXI International Congress, Chicago, IL, 1998.

Courses Taught:

Graduate Seminars:

Culture, Power, and Authority in the Early Modern Spanish World

Foundations of Graduate Study in History

History of the Spanish Conquest

Teaching World History

Theory and Practice of Digital History

The Historiography of the Colonial Andes

The Profession of History (Professionalization course.)

Undergraduate Courses:

Survey of Early Latin American History

Survey of Modern Latin American History

History of the Early Andes

Indigenous Peoples of Latin America: From Indian to Peasant and Back
Again

History of Early Latin America: Colonialism, Culture, Community

History of Modern Latin America: Nation and its Discontents

The Conquest of Spanish America

History of Women in Early Spanish America

Andean Republics: Nation and its Discontents

History of Early South America

Crises from Colony to Republic: Social History of the Trans-Independence Andes

History of the Mexican Revolution

Modern Latin America Through Film

Honors Seminar Historical Research Methods

Gender and Sexuality in Early Latin America

The Life and Afterlife of Ernesto Guevara

Senior Seminar: The United States and Latin America in Image and Action

Copies of my syllabi are available at: http://chadblack.net/teaching